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Low Dose Naltrexone Labeled Orphan Drug for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome by Soin Therapeutics

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The FDA recently granted the pharmaceutical company Soin Therapeutics, based in Dayton, OH, orphan drug status for low dose naltrexone (LDN) to treat complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). 

Soin Therapeutics has discovered that Naltrexone can also work for chronic pain caused by Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in low doses.

Naltrexone manages and treats alcohol and opioid addiction by reducing cravings and highs associated with these substances. 

That said, Dr.Soin, MD, the founder, and CEO of Soin Therapeutics, has discovered that Naltrexone can also work for chronic pain caused by Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in low doses.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is a rare orphan disease that causes severe pain. It most often begins in an extremity and is accompanied by extreme swelling, limited range of motion, changes to the skin or bone structure, and debilitating pain. 

Soin Therapeutics is currently developing its unique formulation of low-dose naltrexone.  The formulation works on treating the mechanism of action.

Soin Therapeutics explains that Orphan diseases are neglected due to the cost associated with developing treatment options for so few patients as it affects less than 200,000 Americans.

Chemical compounds treat the pain rather than masking symptoms using addictive pain medications. 

Because there is no known cure and no practical treatment options for CRPS, Dr.Soin began researching chemical compounds to treat the pain rather than masking symptoms using addictive pain medications. 

As a needed step to commence a large, multicenter, national clinical trial, Soin Therapeutics is in the process of preparing an Investigational New Drug Application meeting with the FDA.

Stimulates the release of endorphins, which are the body’s natural pain killers. 

Naltrexone stimulates the release of endorphins, which are the body’s natural pain killers. Several mechanisms of the disease process seem to respond well to the drug. Of course, one of the most important aspects is that it is not habit-forming like painkillers. 

Email Amol Soin at drsoin@soinneuroscience.com

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